Resources

Trademark Policy

Updated May 18, 2021

Overall Guidelines · Uses that do not require permission · Uses that require permission · Questions · Trademark FAQ


This Policy provides guidelines for use of the “OpenSearch” name and logos (the “OpenSearch Trademarks”) to identify the OpenSearch software. Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates (“Amazon”) strives to be a steward of the OpenSearch brand for the entire OpenSearch Community and is the owner of the OpenSearch Trademarks. As such, the law obligates us to police and protect the trademarks. Therefore, we require use of the OpenSearch Trademarks to be in accordance with this policy. Indeed, Amazon’s own use is designed to be consistent with this Policy.

Our goal is to ensure, on behalf of the OpenSearch Community, that the OpenSearch Trademark remain reliable indicators of quality and security while also permitting community members, software distributors and others to discuss OpenSearch and to accurately describe their products’ affiliation with OpenSearch or the OpenSearch Community, as well as exercise their rights given OpenSearch’s open source nature. Note that this policy only applies to use of the OpenSearch Trademarks.

Overall Guidelines

You may use the “OpenSearch” Trademarks to refer to the OpenSearch software provided that your use is in compliance with this policy. Any other use of the OpenSearch Trademarks requires prior written permission. Overall, your use of the OpenSearch Trademarks must not be confusing, misleading, false, or damaging to the OpenSearch software, the OpenSearch Community or to the OpenSearch Trademarks themselves.

People should always know who they are dealing with, and where the software they are downloading and using came from. You may not use the OpenSearch Trademarks in any manner that implies approval or endorsement by, or association with, the OpenSearch project or the OpenSearch Community. When using the OpenSearch Trademarks, your branding should be distinguishable from OpenSearch trade dress.

You may not use the OpenSearch Trademarks in a manner that may diminish or otherwise damage the goodwill in the OpenSearch Trademarks. The “OpenSearch” word mark should be used in its exact form, and not abbreviated or combined with any other word or words (e.g., “OpenSearch” software rather than “OPNSRCH” or “OpenSearch-ified”). Similarly, the OpenSearch logos should not be modified or integrated with your logos or other designs. You may create a lockup with your logo and an OpenSearch logo side by side so long as your logo is not confusingly similar to the OpenSearch logo and appears first and so long as your use complies with our Brand Guidelines and this policy.

Your use of the OpenSearch Trademarks does not transfer rights in the trademarks or goodwill to you.

Lockup guidelines

Uses that do not require permission

Provided your use complies with this policy and our Brand Guidelines, you may use the OpenSearch logos to link to the OpenSearch website, to indicate that your software or service uses the OpenSearch software, in architecture diagrams to show how your software or service integrates with OpenSearch, and in presentations, social media posts (but not as your account image or avatar), whitepapers, blog posts, and similar content as a reference to the OpenSearch project itself. It should be clear what role the OpenSearch project or software plays in the context of your software or services. The OpenSearch logos should not be more prominent than your own branding.

Use the official versions of the OpenSearch logos available for download here. You may transform the file format itself for ease of use and modify the colors in accordance with the Brand Guidelines.

Logo guidelines

Wordmark guidelines

Provided your use complies with this policy, you may use the “OpenSearch” word mark to accurately reference the OpenSearch software, including on your website, in presentations and publications, at events, in advertising and marketing material, etc., for commercial and noncommercial purposes. You may use the “OpenSearch” word mark and any logos we placed on the software in connection with a redistribution of an official distribution of the OpenSearch software that has not been modified or changed in any way.

Those taking full advantage of the open source nature of the OpenSearch code may make modifications in accordance with the applicable open source license to create Derivative Works (as defined in the Apache License, version 2.0) of OpenSearch. You may use the “OpenSearch” word mark to refer to your Derivative Works of OpenSearch provided (a) you include an additional identifier indicating you as the source of the Derivative Works (e.g., “Foocorp’s OpenSearch Derivative”), (b) you clearly identify your modifications and indicate you are the source of the modifications, (c) your use does not suggest any affiliation between OpenSearch or the OpenSearch Community and you or your Derivative Works of OpenSearch, and (d) your use of the “OpenSearch” word mark should not be more prominent than your additional identifier.

Those taking advantage of the open source nature of the OpenSearch code may also offer services for, or software that works with, OpenSearch or Derivative Works of OpenSearch, such as cloud management services. Users should not be confused as to the source of your software or services. With that in mind, you may use the “OpenSearch” word mark to refer to services for, or software that works with, OpenSearch or Derivative Works of OpenSearch provided (a) you include an additional identifier indicating you as the source of the software or services (e.g., “Foocorp’s OpenSearch Tool” or “Foocorp OpenSearch Service”), (b) if your services or software works with Derivative Works of OpenSearch, you clearly identify the modifications and indicate the source of the modifications, (c) your use does not suggest any affiliation between OpenSearch or the OpenSearch Community and you or your work, and (d) your use of the “OpenSearch” mark should not be more prominent than your additional identifier.

You may also use the “OpenSearch” word mark to make accurate statements about compatibility and interoperability using relational phrases such as “works with,” “runs on,” “compatible with,” and the like (e.g., “Foocorp Software powered by OpenSearch” or “Foocorp Software for OpenSearch” or “Foocorp Software with OpenSearch compatibility”).

Uses that require permission

The following uses of the OpenSearch Trademarks require our prior written approval:

You may not use the OpenSearch Trademarks in connection with use or distribution of the OpenSearch software that is not in compliance with the OpenSearch software copyright license (Apache License, version 2.0).

Questions

If you are unsure whether your use of the OpenSearch Trademarks is permitted under this policy, feel free to contact us and ask. If you have questions about these guidelines or use of any other Amazon trademark, please contact trademarks@amazon.com for assistance, or write to us at:

Amazon.com, Inc.
Attention: Trademarks
PO Box 81226
Seattle, WA 98108-1226

This policy is based in part on the open source trademark policy defined by the Mozilla organization, therefore, the text of this policy (and not the OpenSearch Trademarks themselves) is licensed under the Creative Commons “Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0” license.

Trademark FAQ

  1. Can I create and redistribute my own builds of OpenSearch? If you build OpenSearch from unmodified source and redistribute the results, you may use “OpenSearch” only if it is clear in both the name of your distribution and the content associated with it that your distribution is your build of OpenSearch and not the official build, and you must identify the commit from which it is built, including the commit date.

  2. What can I do if I see abuse of the OpenSearch Trademarks? If you are aware of confusing or misleading use or other misuse of the OpenSearch Trademarks, you may contact us as described above at trademarks@amazon.com so we can investigate further.

  3. This Policy requires modifications and their source to be identified for Derivative Works of OpenSearch, where should I put this information? You may put this information in any location that is commonly used to convey differences from an upstream open source project, such as a NOTICE text or end-user documentation.

  4. What’s new in this update to the Trademark Policy? We’ve got logos! Our talented creative team designed logos the OpenSearch project. We also worked hard on Brand Guidelines to help ensure use of the OpenSearch Trademarks is unified, cohesive, and, simply put, looks good. Please use them!